Wild Bird Feeding Industry
Genetically Engineered Crops
Genetically Modified Organisms or Genetically Engineered Crops
Genetically Modified Organisms (or GMO's), also called Genetically Engineered crops, have become a complex scientific and social issue. The Wild Bird Feeding Industry (WBFI) does not have a position on GMO's. We present the information links on this page to assist you in learning more about the issue.

​What Seeds Used in Wild Bird Feeding Might Be Genetically Engineered?

According to information from Cornell University and other sources, the possibility of genetic engineering in the seeds most attractive to wild birds in North America is:
  •  Black Oil Sunflower: No genetic engineering program, no modified seed available
  • Nyjer: No genetic engineering program, no modified seed available
  • Peanut Kernels: No genetic engineering program, no modified seed available
  • Millet: No genetic engineering program, no modified seed available
  • Striped Sunflower: No genetic engineering program, no modified seed available
  • Fine Cracked Corn: Seed from GMO varieties readily available.
  • Milo: No genetic engineering program, no modified seed available
  • Safflower: No genetic engineering program, no modified seed available
  • Flax: No genetic engineering program, no modified seed available
  • Canary Seed: No genetic engineering program, no modified seed available
Resources for Additional Information
​https://gmoanswers.com/ask/how-much-food-genetically-modified?gclid=CJOHto373cYCFc4XHwodym0JOw
This website is a question and answer format that links to resources and other current content on genetically modified organisms and biotechnology.

Cornell University: The GEO-PIE Project was developed to create objective educational materials exploring the complex scientific and social issues associated with genetic engineering, to help readers consider those issues for themselves.

http://blogs.cornell.edu/gmodialogue/files/2013/06/Gen-Eng-Food-2013-update_ag-1-17ndy4s.pdf​ This Cornell University blog post from 2013 lists which plant products might contain ingredients made from genetically engineered crops. 

http://biomedsci.cornell.edu/graduate_school/shared/gradschool/Outreach/Genetically_Modified_Organisms/fs10_foodsafety.pdf This link to Cornell University's Fact Sheet #10 discusses food safety of genetically engineered crops.

http://absp2.cornell.edu/resources/briefs/documents/warp_briefs_eng_scr.pdf​  The history of agricultural biotechnology is revealed in this Brief #1 from Cornell University. Read about vaccines, tissue cultures, and other uses in addition to genetic engineering.

http://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstream/handle/1813/37971/CNC2014_6_Smith.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y​ White paper published by Cornell University in 2014 discusses issues and science of genetically engineered organisms.

http://biomedsci.cornell.edu/graduate_school/shared/gradschool/Outreach/Genetically_Modified_Organisms/flier1.pdf  Cornell University Cooperative Extension published this bulletin in 2001. The document offers background information on the issue.

The information contained in this website is unofficial and not intended to represent the opinion or position of the WBFI, its staff, its Board of Directors, or its members. WBFI does not guarantee the accuracy of this report.